Autumn has arrived! Hydration and bones.

AUTUMN HAS ARRIVED! Hydration and bones

How is everyone doing?  I don’t know about you, but I am feeling windswept and damp! It feels like Autumn has well and truly arrived, and so I am taking time to look after myself. In today’s blog, our featured therapist is osteopath Fleur Robertson.  And why keeping good hydration is great for your bones.

The first thing I am doing, at the moment is staying away from alcohol – I am following the ‘stay sober for October’ mantra, choosing mocktails over cocktails and water over wine. It is not always easy, particularly as the nights draw in, but instead of seeing it at limiting myself, I am viewing this as an opportunity to improve my skin and bones with extra hydration. Not to mention improved sleep and energy levels.  Take a look at the mocktail recipe at the bottom of this blog.

Stay hydrated to improve your bones….

As your bones lose minerals and need to rebuild and strengthen, a lack of available calcium can lead to bone loss and eventually osteoporosis. Since water also helps rid the body of toxins, these substances can and do build up in the bones if there is not enough water to carry them away. So, keep a water bottle next to you, on your desk or somewhere you see regularly, and keep drinking water.  Around 8-10 glasses per day.  If you’re thirsty, you’re already dehydrated. So grab a drink now!

Fleur Robertson @ Coombe House clinic

Our featured therapist this week is osteopath Fleur Robertson, at Coombe House clinic in Farnham. Follow this link to the clinic: Coombe House Clinic

Fleur writes:

“Osteopathy is a holistic, hands-on and non-invasive therapy. It offers relief from pain and discomfort, alongside specifically tailored self-help advice and exercises for injuries of the body. From jaw pain to sporting shoulder complaints; from low back issues to disc injuries, Osteopathy can help you find reassurance and a path away from pain; getting you back to the things you love!

Osteopathy works really well in partnership with Pilates, because they both work towards bringing better balance and flexibility to the body. Pilates works at also actively strengthening the core.

Regular exercise is essential for a healthy body and Osteopathy can relieve pain, which is limiting movement; allowing for greater benefit and engagement when participating in Pilates. This helps strengthen postural musculature, benefiting the body and you in so many ways. Whether you’re working from home or running a marathon, if you’re in pain you don’t have to put up with it!”

FACEBOOK group: Pilates for Busy Women

Did you know that I have a Facebook group that offers regular FREE videos? It’s called Free Pilates for busy women working at their desk and you can join the group HERE. On the group you’ll find short and sweet exercises for neck shoulders and back.  Perfect for those of you working from home….

New classes!  New teachers!

You will by now have hopefully seen our new teachers, who joined us this month. They have enabled us to expand our offering of live classes and add a little variation. You can learn more about Vivianne and Monika,  by clicking here, on the Teachers Page of our website.

So the Zoom classes timetable now looks like this:

REMEMBER: Full Zoom membership is still only £45 per month! However, the price goes up to £49 in January.  So if you’re not already a Zoom member, take a look here  to see what benefits there are and to sign up via PayPal.  Don’t forget, to avoid trips to the gym, poor motivation and to ensure targeted, bespoke attention, I can offer 1:1 classes here at the Garden Studio in Farnham. See HERE for all the details.

If the Zoom membership isn’t for you, then of course there’s always the ever popular monthly membership option, still only £9.99 per month!! Click HERE to see what this level can offer you and to sign up. And monthly membership comes with Facebook Live classes, as outlined in the timetable above.

Now, to that mocktail recipe…. Autumn Spiced Mocktail

Ingredients

4 cups diet cranberry juice drink

1 orange, juiced

1/2 Granny Smith apple, cored and cut into slices

1 teaspoon whole cloves

1 cinnamon stick

1 piece fresh ginger cut the size of a penny that’s 1/4 inch thick

1 empty tea bag or cheese cloth

orange slices, rosemary sprigs and cinnamon stick for garnish (optional)

Method

Place ginger, cinnamon stick, and cloves into tea bag and pull drawstring tight. You can also tie spices in cheese cloth if you do not have a tea bag.

I hope you enjoy your mocktail!

Until next time, squeeze and breathe!

Love Hannah x

Best Foods for strong Bones from Farnham Pilates

Farnham Pilates Weekly Blog –
Get Stronger Saturday

Best foods for strong bones

Here is your weekly post on Bone health.

A few Osteoporosis/Bone Health Facts and Figures
Bone remodelling is a lifelong process, but unfortunately bone loss starts to outpace bone gain as we age.  This starts to happen around aged 34 when peak bone mass is achieved for most people….this is not an ‘old person’s issue’!   The decline in oestrogen production also has a negative impact on bone remodelling activity for both sexes – this isn’t, as many think, a ‘female only ‘ issue.  Men are less susceptible to developing osteoporosis but their stats are still pretty compelling.

·         The first 3-5 years following the onset of menopause are associated with an accelerated period of bone mass loss before the decline, settling to a more linear decline as menopause progresses.  Most women are hitting Peri-Menopause in their late 40’s and Menopause in their early 50’s.
·         As bone mass declines and the threshold for osteoporosis is approached and exceeded, the risk of fractures to the hip, spine and other fall fractures is also greatly increased.
·         In the UK and the US 1 in 2 women and 1 in 5 men over 50 will experience a fracture.
·         Research by the National Osteoporosis Society estimates that the daily cost of caring for those who experience disability due to hip fractures is somewhere in the region of £6 Million PER DAY!!
·         The mortality rate for those who experience hip fracture increases by 20% in the 12 months post fracture.
·         There are actually more ‘fragility fractures’ – (300,00)  in  the UK than strokes (275,000)  and heart attacks (110,000)
·         Hip fractures cause the most morbidity with reported mortality rates up to 20-24% in the first year after a hip fracture, and greater risk of dying may persist for at least 5 years afterwards. Loss of function and independence among survivors is profound, with 40% unable to walk independently, 60% requiring assistance a year later. Because of these losses, 33% are totally dependent or in a nursing home in the year following a hip fracture.
·         A 50 year old woman has a 2.8% risk of death related to hip fracture during her remaining lifetime, equivalent to her risk of death from breast cancer.
·         Studies have shown that bone mineral density in postmenopausal women can be maintained or increased with therapeutic exercise.

How diet can help increase bone density for strong bones

Here at Farnham Pilates we marked World Osteoporosis Day with a bone density health check for all Pilates clients. This week we are looking at ways your diet can make a difference to your bone health.

Calcium is vital to bone health and vitamin D helps the body absorb calcium. This is why food supplements often pair them together. If you would rather not take food supplements, consider adjusting your diet to include calcium-rich foods.

Calcium-rich foods

If you tolerate it, including cows’ milk and milk products in your diet is a great way to improve bone density. Other calcium-rich foods include:

  • Figs
  • Plums
  • Dark, leafy greens
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Almonds
  • Molasses.

Good sources of vitamin D: 

  • oily fish, such as salmon, sardines and mackerel 
  • eggs 
  • fortified fat spreads 
  • fortified breakfast cereals 
  • some powdered milks 

If you’ve been diagnosed with osteoporosis, your doctor may prescribe calcium and vitamin D supplements as well as osteoporosis drug treatments if they have concerns that your calcium intake may be low.Extra tips –
– Cook soups using bone broth from Sunday’s chicken (cook the bones and use as the stock!). I also use miso which is good for skin. 
– It’s also helpful to reduce your caffeine intake (caffeine affects how the body absorbs calcium) and to eat a healthy amount of protein every day.
– Reduce salt – excess salt is excreted in the urine along with calcium.
– Alcohol – Chronic alcohol consumption increases level of the parathyroid hormone, which leads to a leaching of calcium from bone; alcohol also has a role in decreasing osteoblast (the bone-making cell) formation.
– Check medications such as steroids – steroids can cause Steroid Induced Osteoporosis
– Reduce high sugar drinks – as phosphoric acid – found in Coca-Cola type drinks has been linked to lower bone density in some epidemiological studies – great information in this blog via Healthy But Smart and it’s also been included in a discussion in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.
– Smoking – Research also suggests that smoking impedes the hormone calcitonin, which helps build bones; Nicotine and free radicals generated whilst smoking destroy ssteoblasts.
– Excess Sugar + Diabetes – High blood sugar slows new bone formation, accelerates bone resorption and impairs fracture healing.

Next week we will look at lifestyle changes you can make to improve your bone health. 

Squeeze and breathe 
Hannah